Why Moths are Obsessed with Lamps | National Geographic

The story of the lamp and the moth is one of fatal attraction. The theory is that these primarily nocturnal insects have evolved to travel by the light of the moon and stars. This way of travel is called transverse orientation. An easy way to think about transverse orientation is to imagine a sailor travelling in the direction of the North Star. In theory, moths similarly follow the light source at a precise position and a precise angle to their bodies. This is how moths would navigate for millions of years … by the light of the moon. What moth evolution couldn’t account for was the proliferation of constant electric light in our modern world. When Thomas Edison patented the lightbulb on January 27, 1880 it was a bad day in moth history. These lightbulbs began to act as artificial moons, confusing moths and overwhelming their senses. Since moths are accustomed to orienting to distant light sources, they can be easily disoriented when a closer light source, like a porch lamp, comes into view. When there are really bright lights or ultraviolet lights, the draw becomes almost irresistible … and insects respond to those lights far more than any other wave length. At night, an ultraviolet source is a super stimulant to a moth. These artificial moons also make moths easy targets for predators like birds, bats, and many other animals. While much is still to be learned about moth behavior, one thing is certain. A moth’s obsession with lamps often proves to be a fatal one.
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Read more in “Why insects like moths are so attracted to bright lights”
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Why Moths are Obsessed with Lamps | National Geographic https://youtu.be/Ul9HIX9YBbM

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Electrical experiments with plants that count and communicate | Greg Gage

Neuroscientist Greg Gage takes sophisticated equipment used to study the brain out of graduate-level labs and brings them to middle- and high-school classrooms (and, sometimes, to the TED stage.) Prepare to be amazed as he hooks up the Mimosa pudica, a plant whose leaves close when touched, and the Venus flytrap to an EKG to show us how plants use electrical signals to convey information, prompt movement and even count.

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The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

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Channel: TED
Published: 2017-10-10 15:17:06
Duration: 9M31S
Views: 707674
Likes: 24733
Favorites: 0

This Sahara Railway Is One of the Most Extreme in the World | Short Film Showcase

At more than 430 miles long, the Mauritania Railway has been transporting iron ore across the blistering heat of the Sahara Desert since 1963.
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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

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One of the longest and heaviest trains in the world, the 1.8-mile beast runs from the mining center of Zouerat to the port city of Nouadhibou on Africa’s Atlantic coast. The train is the bedrock of the Mauritanian economy and a lifeline to the outside world for the people who live along its route.

Hop on board the ‘Backbone of the Sahara’ with filmmaker Macgregor for an incredible journey through the stunning Western Saharan landscape.

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This Sahara Railway Is One of the Most Extreme in the World | Short Film Showcase
https://youtu.be/jEo-ykjmHgg

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-07-10 16:37:23
Duration: 12M50S
Views: 2138269
Likes: 42853
Favorites: 0

Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic

A thin mother polar bear roaming with her critically hungry cub inspects a resting walrus, on the chance that it’s sick or dead, but it’s quite capable of defending itself.
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Travis Wilkinson and his family were on a sailing trip in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, far north of the Arctic Circle. In late July, 2015, they were traveling through Hinlopen Strait, west of the largest island, Spitsbergen—an impossible route some summers, when pack ice blocks passage. But that summer, ice was especially sparse, making hunting harder for polar bears. These apex predators favor waiting at the sea ice’s edge, striking seals as they approach. A few days earlier, the Wilkinson family had been farther north, near the ice. There, bears looked healthy. But the scene just after midnight on July 23 was desperate. Mother and cub were struggling, skin hanging loose. According to Jon Aars, of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the cub, seven or eight months old, was likely to die if its mother didn’t eat soon. She probably wasn’t lactating. Wilkinson saw the bear sniff the air, picking up something of interest. This thin female couldn’t attack a healthy, full-grown walrus. A carcass would solve their problem. If the walrus were weak or sick, predation might be an option. But that walrus was alive and well. The situation was unworkable. The search for food went on.

Read more about the polar bear and walrus, “Desperate for Food, Polar Bear Tests Walrus”
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Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/FAHA6M7xT5M

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-02-09 21:43:44
Duration: 2M59S
Views: 3391292
Likes: 8242
Favorites: 0

Rare Video: Japan Tsunami | National Geographic

June 9, 2011 — The March 11 earthquake and tsunami left more than 28,000 dead or missing. See incredible footage of the tsunami swamping cities and turning buildings into rubble.
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Rare Video: Japan Tsunami | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/oWzdgBNfhQU

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2011-06-13 16:39:28
Duration: 3M35S
Views: 18667436
Likes: 67932
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Top 20 Facts That Will Make You Say “I Had No Idea”

The internet is chock full of facts. Join me as we take a look at 20 facts and images that will make you say ‘I Had No Idea.’
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Be Amazed at these facts That Will Make You Say “I Had No Idea”! Apple’s Headphones – Must earbuds have two or three holes. The iPhone Clock App – So, let’s talk about the iPhone Clock App. The USB Logo – Easy to corrupt and one sharp tug away from snapping in two, most people wouldn’t associate the USB with a god of unimaginable power. The Dairy Queen Lid – Why do cold things hate us so much? Ketchup Containers – What were the manufacturers thinking!? The Power Button’s Shape – Take a look at the power button on a nearby electronic device. Go ahead, I’ll Wait. The Direction of Your Fuel Arrows – Have you ever pulled up at a gas station and realized that your gas cap is on the other side? Pen Cap Holes – Kids will stick anything in their mouth if given a chance. Airplane Window Holes – Is that hole proof of a gremlin at work? Pygmy Jean Pockets – They aren’t big enough for credit cards, lip balms, or Lilliputians.

Converse Holes – A lot of people have fallen victim to wet feet thanks to these holes . Measuring Tape Edge – This one takes a keen eye to notice, but the serrated edge of measuring tape is there for a reason. Pot Handle Holes – While every Italian grandma can tell you what the holes in pot handles are for – you might not know. Tic Tac Lids – Tic Tac has thought of everything! The 57 on a Bottle of Heinz – Heinz today makes more than 5700 distinct products. So, why does the bottle say 57? Take Out Containers – Surprise, surprise! It turns out that condiment cups aren’t the only origami containers out there. Airport Runway Numbers – Every runway in the world has two numbers on it. But, what the heck do they mean? Reversed Military Flags – Americans are real sticklers when it comes to their flag. Fire Casts No Shadow – Take a look at this picture . Do you notice something missing? Maple Syrup Handles – Have you ever held a bottle of 100-percent real maple syrup—or helped smuggle one across the Canadian border?

Channel: BE AMAZED
Published: 2018-03-13 20:49:01
Duration: 10M47S
Views: 11627942
Likes: 58012
Favorites: 0

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