Watch: ‘Slime Eels’ Explode on Highway After Bizarre Traffic Accident | National Geographic

A car accident caused thousands of hagfish to spill on the highway, coating the road—and even a car—with slime. Hagfish, also called slime eels, secrete huge amounts of an extremely slippery mucus when stressed. The Oregon Department of Transportation used firehoses and a bulldozer to clear away the goo. The fish were likely destined for Asia, where many countries consider them a delicacy.
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Click here to read ‘Slime Eels’ Explode on Highway After Bizarre Traffic Accident.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/hagfish-slime-oregon-highway/

Watch: ‘Slime Eels’ Explode on Highway After Bizarre Traffic Accident | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/lySzTv6bmEI

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See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion | National Geographic

They move so fast that human eyes see only a hovering spot of color, a blur of wings. But when frozen in time by high-speed cameras, hummingbirds yield their secrets.
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Hummingbirds live exclusively in the Americas. The smallest can weigh less than two grams. The largest, the giant hummingbird found in Peru and Chile, tips the scales at around 20 grams. You could send something that weight in the U.S. mail with a single first-class stamp. World’s smallest birds is just one of several distinctions that hummingbird species claim. They’re the only birds that can hover in still air for 30 seconds or more. They’re the only birds with a “reverse gear”—that is, they can truly fly backward. And they’re the record holders for the fastest metabolic rate of any vertebrate on the planet.

Read the entire National Geographic magazine story on hummingbirds.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/hummingbird-secrets-speed-worlds-smallest-bird/

This video was based on research done by Clark lab at US Riverside, Dudley lab at UC Berkeley, and the Altshuler lab at the University of British Columbia.
http://animalaeroacoustics.ucr.edu/
https://berkeleyflightlab.org/
http://altshuler.zoology.ubc.ca/

The photographer would also like to thank Victor Ortega-Jimenez, Katie Johnson, Sean Wilcox, David Rankin and Nicholas Donnelly.
http://ornithopterus.com/
http://mightypixel.net/

Learn more about photographer Anand Varma and his work here.
https://www.instagram.com/anandavarma/

See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/RtUQ_pz5wlo

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-17 14:54:14
Duration: 2M22S
Views: 66420
Likes: 3280
Favorites: 0

Watch: Lion Cub Rescued After Falling Down 80-Foot Well | National Geographic

A two-year-old lioness was rescued from an 80-foot-deep well by villagers in western India.
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The cub got separated from its pride after entering the village and fell down the well when it tried to jump across the opening. It took six hours for the villagers to reach the cub, all while treading water to keep her head above water. A man was lowered down the well in a metal cage so he could put a lasso around the big cat. After being treated for minor injuries, the cub was released in the forest.

Click here to read Watch: Lioness Cub Rescued From 80-Foot Well.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/asiatic-lion-cub-well-rescue-india-Gujarat-spd/

Watch: Lion Cub Rescued After Falling Down 80-Foot Well | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/QIcG3l8Qqn0

National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-17 15:28:53
Duration: 1M6S
Views: 25477
Likes: 903
Favorites: 0

Watch a Male Tarantula Risk Death for Sex | National Geographic

Death and getting stabbed in the face are risks this male tarantula must brave to mate.
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Courtship between two giant baboon tarantulas comes with the risk of injury and death for the male. This rare video begins with the male shaking his legs, a sign that the tarantulas are preparing to mate. Then, the male approaches cautiously, since many females spiders will eat their partner. The female also could potentially bite into the male’s face during mating, which goes to show that tarantula sex can be risky business.

Read “Watch Baboon Spiders Mate in Rare Video.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/tarantula-spiders-mating-sex-south-africa-spd/

Watch a Male Tarantula Risk Death for Sex | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/jB73ENR83Yg

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-12 17:44:02
Duration: 1M49S
Views: 63728
Likes: 1268
Favorites: 0

See the Huge Crack in West Antarctica Before Iceberg Broke Off | National Geographic

A giant iceberg the size of Delaware has broken off the Larsen C Ice Shelf in West Antarctica. This footage from February 2017 shows a major rift in the ice shelf before the iceberg broke free. The newly independent iceberg is one of the largest ever recorded. Warming waters caused by climate change will continue to accelerate the melting of ice around the world.
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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

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Click here to read “The Larsen C Ice Shelf Collapse Is Just the Beginning—Antarctica Is Melting”.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/antarctica-sea-level-rise-climate-change/

See the Huge Crack in West Antarctica Before Iceberg Broke Off | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/3qFYoVeKof4

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-14 19:49:00
Duration: 1M5S
Views: 216083
Likes: 2900
Favorites: 0

Slimy Eels Cause Four-Car Pile-Up In Oregon

A flatbed truck spilled 7,500 pounds of slime eels onto an Oregon highway, in what quickly became the worst commute ever.

Eel truck driver Salvatore J. Tragale was delivering the slime eels, also known by their gentler name of hagfish, to be shipped to Korea for consumption. When he lost control of the flatbed near highway construction on U.S. 101, the 13 containers of eels spilled onto the road, causing a four-car pile-up.

No humans were seriously injured, but thousands of hagfish died. Despite the challenges, the fire department and the Oregon Department of Transportation were able to get the road cleared within a few hours.

The Oregonian points out that “hagfish slime – a type of mucus – can expand to more than five gallons when combined with water.”

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Channel: Vocativ
Published: 2017-07-14 16:53:41
Duration: 2M
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