Watch: Curious Puffin Befriends a Tourist | National Geographic

A tourist in the Shetland Isles, Scotland, made an unlikely friend—a puffin.
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Atlantic puffins live most of their lives at sea, and they only come onto land to breed. 60 percent of the world’s population lives in Iceland, and they have been historically hunted for their feathers and meat. The bird showed no signs of fear, even stopping under the tourist’s leg and tapping at her camera lens. After a few minutes the puffin wandered off, leaving the tourist with an unforgettable experience.

Read “Watch This Curious Puffin Befriend a Tourist.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/Atlantic-puffin-video-scotland-spd/

Watch: Curious Puffin Befriends a Tourist | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/GUq1Wp4LdZI

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See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion | National Geographic

They move so fast that human eyes see only a hovering spot of color, a blur of wings. But when frozen in time by high-speed cameras, hummingbirds yield their secrets.
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Hummingbirds live exclusively in the Americas. The smallest can weigh less than two grams. The largest, the giant hummingbird found in Peru and Chile, tips the scales at around 20 grams. You could send something that weight in the U.S. mail with a single first-class stamp. World’s smallest birds is just one of several distinctions that hummingbird species claim. They’re the only birds that can hover in still air for 30 seconds or more. They’re the only birds with a “reverse gear”—that is, they can truly fly backward. And they’re the record holders for the fastest metabolic rate of any vertebrate on the planet.

Read the entire National Geographic magazine story on hummingbirds.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/hummingbird-secrets-speed-worlds-smallest-bird/

This video was based on research done by Clark lab at US Riverside, Dudley lab at UC Berkeley, and the Altshuler lab at the University of British Columbia.
http://animalaeroacoustics.ucr.edu/
https://berkeleyflightlab.org/
http://altshuler.zoology.ubc.ca/

The photographer would also like to thank Victor Ortega-Jimenez, Katie Johnson, Sean Wilcox, David Rankin and Nicholas Donnelly.
http://ornithopterus.com/
http://mightypixel.net/

Learn more about photographer Anand Varma and his work here.
https://www.instagram.com/anandavarma/

See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/RtUQ_pz5wlo

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-17 14:54:14
Duration: 2M22S
Views: 95964
Likes: 3737
Favorites: 0

Here’s How Much Plastic Trash Is Littering the Earth | National Geographic

These plastic bottles illustrate how humans discard a shocking amount of plastic waste into the environment.
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Underwater photographer Huai Su filmed a diver collecting an endless amount of plastic bottles that litter the seafloor off Xiaoliuqiu Island, Taiwan. This is just one shocking example of the astonishing amount of plastic that can pollute our environment. An estimated 6.3 billion metric tons of plastic waste has been generated, a new study found, and only 9% of that total is recycled. Most of it—79%—is in a landfill or escaped into the natural environment, and only 12% has been incinerated.

Read “A Whopping 91% of Plastic Isn’t Recycled.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/plastic-produced-recycling-waste-ocean-trash-debris-environment/

Here’s How Much Plastic Trash Is Littering the Earth | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/jyLjUEOcLgg

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-19 21:50:52
Duration: 1M24S
Views: 29854
Likes: 1122
Favorites: 0

First-Ever Video Shows Whales Flapping Like Birds | National Geographic

Humpback whales have been observed using their flippers in a previously unknown way—flapping them like a bird.
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Biologists filmed this first-ever video off the coast of South Africa. Previously it was thought that the whales used these flippers to steer in the water, not propel themselves. Two whales were recorded flapping to lunge forward while feeding. It’s not clear how common this behavior is, or whether the flippers were the sole means of propulsion.

Read “Rare Video Captures Never-Before-Seen Whale Behavior.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/humpback-whales-oceans-feeding-flippers/

First-Ever Video Shows Whales Flapping Like Birds | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/YCE1K0LIhnc

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-17 15:51:35
Duration: 1M23S
Views: 18357
Likes: 793
Favorites: 0

Revealing the Face of a 1,600-Year-Old Mummy | National Geographic

See how science and technology helped reconstruct the face of the iconic Moche mummy, the Señora de Cao.
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Experts have recreated the face of a Peruvian noblewoman who lived and died around A.D. 400. Using the latest forensic technology, they scanned the mummified remains of the Señora of Cao, who belonged to the pre-Inca Moche culture. The grave of the Señora was discovered in 2005 at a site in El Brujo on the north coast of Peru. Since then, she has become a symbol of Peruvian womanhood and indigenous cultural identity.

Read “CSI Tools Bring a Mummy’s Face to Life”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06/csi-tools-mummy-moche-peru-cao-brujo/

Revealing the Face of a 1,600-Year-Old Mummy | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/-lxFtO0kiaw

National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-06 13:46:47
Duration: 2M5S
Views: 199795
Likes: 2829
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This Strange Worm’s Mouth Is Also Its Anus | National Geographic

Danish Ho recently filmed this strange-looking animal in Malaysia that is commonly known as a hammerhead worm. According to experts, it belongs to the genus Bipalum,but its exact species is unknown. The biology of a hammerhead worm is also very strange. Its mouth is also its anus. If separated, a piece of its body can grow into another worm. And the worm liquefies prey, which it then sucks through its mouth, excreting waste from the same opening later.
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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

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Read more at ” Weird Animal Question of the Week.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/animals-worms-hammerheads-mating.html

This Strange Worm’s Mouth Is Also Its Anus | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/GxZPBw5w3N0

National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-19 15:43:08
Duration: 1M8S
Views: 10590
Likes: 566
Favorites: 0

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