See Secret Eating Habits of Deep-Sea Dwellers | National Geographic

Jellyfish and other jelly-like animals are more important to the deep ocean food web than previously thought, based on findings from years of video captured by MBARI.
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The ocean depths hold a complex network of predators and prey. Some links in that network, once unknown, have now come into view.
When preyed upon, gelatinous animals, like jellyfish and comb jellies, quickly become unrecognizable, and so are undercounted in predators’ guts. Plus, jellies are hard to catch with a net. But with remote-operated vehicles, MBARI researchers have been filming ocean life—including jellies—for decades. By reviewing their footage, MBARI has changed the model of the deep-sea ecosystem. They’ve found that jelly-like animals play a bigger role than previously thought. Jellies served as a food source for several types of sea creatures, and also preyed upon a number of species, such as squid. The food web just got a little more tangled.

READ: See the Hidden Eating Habits of Deep-Sea Creatures
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/12/deep-sea-food-web-study-underwater-vehicles-video-spd/

See Secret Eating Habits of Deep-Sea Dwellers | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/vCBP25B7hAc

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A deep sea dive into Bermuda’s hidden depths

Guardian environment reporter Oliver Milman joins a group of scientists on an underwater expedition off the Bermuda coast to help chart its hidden depths and gauge the general health of the area’s reef and coral. Travelling in a two-man submersible, Milman and submarine pilot Kelvin Magee go on a journey 500ft below the surface.

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Channel: The Guardian
Published: 2016-08-17 15:21:06
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This Is What It’s Like Inside North Korea’s Luxury Ski Resort | Short Film Showcase

Get a glimpse of what life is like in North Korea, a country rarely seen by foreigners. Britain’s fastest snowboarder Jamie Barrow is our guide around the DPRK’s capital city Pyongyang before he heads up to the slopes of Masikryong. Follow filmmaker Jackson Kingsley on Twitter at @cinematicamedia.

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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

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Britain’s fastest snowboarder Jamie Barrow is our guide around the DPRK’s capital city Pyongyang before he heads up to the slopes of Masikryong.

Follow filmmaker Jackson Kingsley on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/cinematicamedia

This Is What It’s Like Inside North Korea’s Luxury Ski Resort | Short Film Showcase
https://youtu.be/csoP8Didoi0

National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-08-04 19:18:23
Duration: 13M10S
Views: 3534719
Likes: 40662
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10 Deep Sea Discoveries

Did you know that whale’s carcasses are deep sea ecosystems? From new species, to rare ancient animals, these are 10 Deep Sea Discoveries !

Whale-Falls …. You can think of it as a deep sea graveyard. These areas are created when the carcass of a cetacean has fallen to the abyssal zone on the ocean floor, at depths of over 6000 feet. Complex ecosystems are created usually arriving in 3 stages: First, mobile scavengers like sharks arrive, followed by smaller animals like crabs and shrimp. Eventually, bacteria shows up to break down fats, while Osedax (ossa-dx), also known as zombie worms because they have no eyes or mouth, extract bone marrow. Decades worth of sustenance can be provided to deep sea organisms thanks to these localized ecosystems. It’s not unlike an all-you can eat buffet courtesy of the friendly neighborhood whale.

Cradle of Marine Life — Between 2002 and 2005 an international team of scientists examined samples from the Antarctica’s Weddell (wed-dell) Sea and nearby areas at depths up to 20,000 feet, discovering at least 700 new species. Among the creatures documented were a gourd-shaped carnivorous sponge (called Chondrocladia kon-dro-clay-dee-uh), free-swimming worms, and nearly 674 species of isopod crustaceans, 585 of which had never before been encountered. Angelika Brandt, the head researcher said, “The Antarctic deep sea is potentially the cradle of life of the global marine species.”

(huge sea sponge)
In 2009, researchers from the US and Australia explored the Tasman Fracture Zone. Located off Australia’s south coast, the team found several new species, including Australia’s deepest known carnivorous sea squirt, giant sponges and sea spiders. In addition, the researchers found deep sea fossil corals that dated over 10,000 years old at depths of 1 mile. The 4 week expedition used a deep-diving US submarine that was about the size of a small car and could reach depths of more than 2.5 miles!

Hypothesizing among scientists that deep sea fish make noise had been going on for half a century. That was based on the observation that fish possess organs which can be used for said purpose. In 2012, scientists managed to catch 12 distinct sounds believed to have originated from deep sea fish. Researchers from the University of Massachusetts lowered a hydrophone into the water over 2,200 meters deep and let it record for 24 hours. Typical noises of whales and dolphins were identified … but so were those 12 other unique sounds, which included grunting and quacking noises. Since most fish emit low-frequency sounds, it’s thought the noises could have originated from deep sea fish, such as monkfish. Because deep sea fish live in darkness, the noises might function as ‘calls’ by which to communicate with each other. Think those fish would have some deep conversations? Let us know in the comments!

A rarely-seen deep sea creature was observed — and caught — in 2013. A Florida fisherman caught the 14-foot monster, which was described as a dinosaur. While it wasn’t a dinosaur, it must have been pretty old … it had barnacles on it. It was actually identified as a deep sea species called a “Hookskate” or “Fingerskate”, and weighed some 800 pounds. There still isn’t much known about creature except that it seems to live at depths of 3000 feet and belongs to the same family as the more recognizable stingray. They’ve been found in waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico, southern Brazil and the east coast of Florida where this one was caught. The fisherman, Mark Quartino, released the fish back to the ocean after tagging it. Maybe Mr. Quartino had some sympathy … his nickname is “Mark the Shark”!

A octopus from the deep sea was captured on video by a remotely operated camera … 1.25 miles deep into the abyss off the Oregon coast. Researchers made the discovery in 2005, but only released their findings in 2011. The ghostly creature was actually a dumbo octopus, known to live closely to a hydrothermal vent sprouting from underwater volcanoes in the northeast Pacific Ocean. They’re the deepest dwelling members of any octopus species, some of them living as far down as 23,000 feet. Because of that, they are rarely seen. Not a whole lot is known about these creatures, since such extreme depths would crush most submarines like a soda can. We do know where they get their name, though: It’s due to their fins that resemble the ears of Disney’s Dumbo elephant. But some people think the octopus more closely resembles Boos, the nemesis of Mario Brothers. What do you think?

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Channel: Epic Wildlife
Published: 2016-07-17 14:54:33
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See What Happens When You Tickle a Rat | National Geographic

By studying how rats react to tickling, scientists are gaining insight into how a brain processes and responds to the sensation. Video courtesy Humboldt University of Berlin
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Why do you laugh when you’re tickled? Scientists at Humboldt University of Berlin are studying rats to try and solve the longstanding mystery. Given the right conditions, and enough back and belly tickling by a researcher, ratscan come to associate a researcher’s cotton gloved hand with the sensation of being tickled. Tickling makes them “giggle,” albeit in frequencies too high for human ears to hear. The rats develop a fondness for the human hands, chasing their scurrying fingers in circles. The scientists observe the rat ticklishness, and track how their brain processes the sensation, hoping to uncover clues about the laugh-inducing feeling.

READ: What Happens When Scientists Tickle a Rat
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/rats-tickling-brains-moods/

See What Happens When You Tickle a Rat | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/d-84UJpYFRM

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2016-11-30 22:02:50
Duration: 3M19S
Views: 5570985
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Pompeii: New Studies Reveal Secrets From a Dead City | National Geographic

The ancient Roman town of Pompeii is one of the world’s most famous archaeological sites. Its exquisite villas, buried by volcanic ash in A.D. 79, have been the subject of study since the 18th century. But even now scientists continue to learn from the site. Modern imaging and chemical analysis of the human remains are adding depth to the picture of how Pompeii’s inhabitants lived.
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READ: Bringing the Ghostly City of Pompeii Back to Life
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/04/160408-pompeii-roman-vesuvius-eruption-disaster/

PRODUCED BY: Inediz
VIDEOGRAPHER: Claire Jeantet and Fabrice Caterini
MUSIC Ludi, Musica Romana
ADDITIONAL MATERIAL: Pompeii Soprintendenza

Pompeii: New Studies Reveal Secrets From a Dead City | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/pSg_Sd94Y8k

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2016-08-04 21:54:36
Duration: 3M21S
Views: 127137
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