See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion | National Geographic

They move so fast that human eyes see only a hovering spot of color, a blur of wings. But when frozen in time by high-speed cameras, hummingbirds yield their secrets.
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Hummingbirds live exclusively in the Americas. The smallest can weigh less than two grams. The largest, the giant hummingbird found in Peru and Chile, tips the scales at around 20 grams. You could send something that weight in the U.S. mail with a single first-class stamp. World’s smallest birds is just one of several distinctions that hummingbird species claim. They’re the only birds that can hover in still air for 30 seconds or more. They’re the only birds with a “reverse gear”—that is, they can truly fly backward. And they’re the record holders for the fastest metabolic rate of any vertebrate on the planet.

Read the entire National Geographic magazine story on hummingbirds.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/hummingbird-secrets-speed-worlds-smallest-bird/

This video was based on research done by Clark lab at US Riverside, Dudley lab at UC Berkeley, and the Altshuler lab at the University of British Columbia.
http://animalaeroacoustics.ucr.edu/
https://berkeleyflightlab.org/
http://altshuler.zoology.ubc.ca/

The photographer would also like to thank Victor Ortega-Jimenez, Katie Johnson, Sean Wilcox, David Rankin and Nicholas Donnelly.
http://ornithopterus.com/
http://mightypixel.net/

Learn more about photographer Anand Varma and his work here.
https://www.instagram.com/anandavarma/

See Hummingbirds Fly, Shake, Drink in Amazing Slow Motion | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/RtUQ_pz5wlo

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Hummingbirds Ultra Slow Motion – Amazing Facts, Full HD

Over 20 amazing Facts about Hummingbirds. Slow motion footage of the hummingbird in Full HD. Great for school nature projects. Watch hummingbirds fly in ULTRA slow motion. Watch the humming bird hover and fly backwards in slow motion. Videos of hummingbird babies (chicks) being fed and much more.
Channel: Nature’s Invitation
Published: 2016-08-13 06:26:22
Duration: 5M34S
Views: 332876
Likes: 2431
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Watch: ‘Slime Eels’ Explode on Highway After Bizarre Traffic Accident | National Geographic

A car accident caused thousands of hagfish to spill on the highway, coating the road—and even a car—with slime. Hagfish, also called slime eels, secrete huge amounts of an extremely slippery mucus when stressed. The Oregon Department of Transportation used firehoses and a bulldozer to clear away the goo. The fish were likely destined for Asia, where many countries consider them a delicacy.
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National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

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Click here to read ‘Slime Eels’ Explode on Highway After Bizarre Traffic Accident.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/hagfish-slime-oregon-highway/

Watch: ‘Slime Eels’ Explode on Highway After Bizarre Traffic Accident | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/lySzTv6bmEI

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-17 15:01:09
Duration: 57S
Views: 52510
Likes: 882
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Watch: Lion Cub Rescued After Falling Down 80-Foot Well | National Geographic

A two-year-old lioness was rescued from an 80-foot-deep well by villagers in western India.
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The cub got separated from its pride after entering the village and fell down the well when it tried to jump across the opening. It took six hours for the villagers to reach the cub, all while treading water to keep her head above water. A man was lowered down the well in a metal cage so he could put a lasso around the big cat. After being treated for minor injuries, the cub was released in the forest.

Click here to read Watch: Lioness Cub Rescued From 80-Foot Well.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/asiatic-lion-cub-well-rescue-india-Gujarat-spd/

Watch: Lion Cub Rescued After Falling Down 80-Foot Well | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/QIcG3l8Qqn0

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-17 15:28:53
Duration: 1M6S
Views: 23853
Likes: 873
Favorites: 0

These Sea Spiders ‘Breathe’ Through Their Legs | National Geographic

A new study found that sea spiders use their extensive gut to pump oxygen through their bodies. Most animals use their heart to circulate blood and oxygen. But sea spiders “breathe” by taking oxygen in through their external skeleton and circulating the oxygen with their gut that runs throughout their bodies, including through their legs.
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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

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Read “Underwater ‘Spider’ Breathes Through Its Legs.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/oceans-sea-spiders-legs-heart/

These Sea Spiders ‘Breathe’ Through Their Legs | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/ejayKNhfudE

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-14 19:57:48
Duration: 1M3S
Views: 35785
Likes: 1052
Favorites: 0

Big Engines Starting Up

This video features Big Engine Start Up compilation If you wanna see some biggest engine sin the world watch this video and if you like the video hit the like button.

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Channel: Car News Central
Published: 2017-03-15 18:11:24
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