See an Extremely Rare Jungle Dog | National Geographic

One of the Amazon rain forest’s most elusive inhabitants, the short-eared dog, has been caught on video in southeastern Peru.
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About the size of a fox, these jungle canines are incredibly difficult to spot. In fact, a journey to the Amazon is far more likely to yield a jaguar sighting than a glimpse of a wild short-eared dog. In late May, 2014, conservation biologist Lary Reeves set up a camera trap near a white-lipped peccary carcass. Wanting to record what he’d heard was a “king vulture fiesta” at the carcass, Reeves braved the rampaging insects and rancid stench to set the camera a few feet from the carcass.

Read: Rare Amazon Jungle Dog Caught on Camera
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140626-short-eared-dog-camera-tambopata-amazon-jungle/

See an Extremely Rare Jungle Dog | National Geographic
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This Is the Most ‘Indestructible’ Animal on Earth | National Geographic

This isn’t any ordinary microscopic organism. It’s a tardigrade—the most ‘indestructible’ animal on Earth.
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Also called water bears, tardigrades can survive up to 30 years without food, live in volcanoes, and endure the vacuum of space. Researchers say they could even survive an asteroid impact like the one that led to the extinction of the dinosaurs. Only the eventual death of the sun may be enough to wipe out the tardigrades.

Click here to read “These ‘Indestructible’ Animals Would Survive a Planet-Wide Apocalypse.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/tardigrades-water-bears-extinction-earth-science/

This Is the Most ‘Indestructible’ Animal on Earth | National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-28 04:10:38
Duration: 59S
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Hawk Raised by Eagles Is Starting to Act Like One | National Geographic

An orphaned red-tailed hawk that was adopted by bald eagles has defied expectations and survived, and now it’s acting like an eagle.
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Nicknamed “Spunky,” the young hawk was spotted living in an eagle’s nest in June. Experts initially thought his chances for survival were low. Hawks and eagles are normally mortal enemies. Hawks feed on small rodents, rabbits, and snakes, but Spunky was seen eating a flounder that he stole from one of the other eagles. He has shown some signs of his hawk ancestry including swooping down and picking up forest debris, which young hawks do while learning to catch prey. Spunky’s time with his adopted family may be short. Soon the eagles will migrate north, but hawks typically don’t leave the region.

Footage: Lynda Robson, Hancock Wildlife Foundation
Christian Sasse / SassePhoto / www.youtube.com/Sassephoto

Click here to read “Why This Young Hawk Thinks It’s an Eagle.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/red-tailed-hawk-adopted-by-bald-eagles-video-spd/

Hawk Raised by Eagles Is Starting to Act Like One | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/AUM99UXMbow

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-26 22:08:19
Duration: 1M35S
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Swimming Eagle Rescued From Bay | National Geographic

A family spotted an injured bald eagle swimming in the Bay of Fundy off Nova Scotia, Canada and brought it to safety.
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They rescued it from drowning and brought it to the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre, where the raptor spent several days recuperating. When it was healthy enough, the center’s staff released it to take to the sky again.

Read more about the swimming bald eagle rescue.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/bald-eagle-swimming-rescued-video-spd/

Swimming Eagle Rescued From Bay | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/enA9uFtsOaM

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-08-03 19:11:13
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Watch: Extremely Rare Footage of Wild Tigers in Bhutan | National Geographic

World Wildlife Fund camera traps captured some of the first-ever images of wild tigers in Bhutan.
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Photojournalist Emmanuel Rondeau traveled the country for three months looking for the elusive big cats. As few as 100 wild tigers are left in Bhutan. There are less than 3,900 left in the wild worldwide. Tigers are considered endangered, and their numbers have declined rapidly due to habitat loss and poaching.

Footage and photos: Emmanuel Rondeau / WWF-UK

Watch: Extremely Rare Footage of Wild Tigers in Bhutan | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/YRv-dVy_Pnw

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-31 20:52:39
Duration: 1M3S
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Watch: Adorable Baby Brown Bear Rescued | National Geographic

This three-month-old brown bear cub was rescued after being found alone in western Russia. It was transported to Meshchyora National Park by wildlife authorities. It was kept in a rehab center while being examined. They hope that the cub will be able to reintegrate into the wild after being released. Bears as young as five months old have been found to survive on their own in the wild, and the more contact the cub has with humans the more difficult it becomes to rehabilitate. Brown bears are rare or extinct in western Russia, where they face threats from human contact.
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Click here to read “Watch: Orphan Bear Cub Moves to Adopted Home.”
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/07/orphan-brown-bear-cub-rescued-russia-video-spd/

Watch: Adorable Baby Brown Bear Rescued | National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-07-31 18:42:17
Duration: 1M27S
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