Sea Cucumber Poop Is Surprisingly Good For the Ecosystem | National Geographic

There are about 1,250 different species of sea cucumber across the world’s oceans. This is Thelenota anax. And yes, it’s doing what you think it’s doing. Sea cucumber poop is surprisingly important for the ecosystem.
➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

Get More National Geographic:
Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite
Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo
Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter
Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta

This one picks up sediment with an array of tentacles and stuffs it into its mouth. Sea cucumbers digest organic material and eject everything else. So, what comes out is actually cleaner than what went in. “Cleaner” sand may prevent algal blooms, which can cause fish to suffocate from lack of oxygen. Also, subtropical seagrass beds appear to grow better wherever sea cucumbers are around. Coral reefs benefit from the alkalinity of the sea cucumbers droppings, buffering them from the effects of ocean acidification. Sea cucumbers don’t look the part, but they have an important role underwater.

Read more in: Watch: Sea Cucumbers Are The Ocean’s Vacuum Cleaners
https://on.natgeo.com/2Ny1TSh

Sea Cucumber Poop Is Surprisingly Good For the Ecosystem | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/MpHJJ5bOI-Q

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Deep Sea Fish Farming in Geodesic Domes: Upgrade

In this episode of Upgrade, Motherboard goes to Baja California, Mexico to get a firsthand look at these free floating pods, and to get an understanding for why we need better ways to cultivate our future food sources.

Whether it’s found on a plate of sushi, grilled in our backyard, or thrown on pasta, seafood is a staple for many diets around the world, and demand is growing. And as the commercial seafood industry booms, fish stocks worldwide face perilous declines.

We’ve surpassed our capacity to sustainably fish wild caught fish, shrimp, and mollusks from the ocean, and so we’ve turned to aquaculture, or fish farming, as a strategy to meet demand for our growing appetites for water-borne critters. The aquaculture industry is growing fast. According to the FAO, per capita production of seafood from aquaculture has increased 6.9 percent annually since 1970.

Unfortunately for us and for our Earth, current methods of fish farming often involve crowded, tethered pens, which can have poor water circulation and contribute to the spread of disease, and put large amounts of environmental stress on the surrounding waterways.

This is where Steve Page of Ocean Farm Technologies comes in. Taking inspiration from naturally-occurring schools of fish and Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic domes, Page co-designed the Aquapod, a free floating, untethered deep ocean fish habitat which reduces overcrowding, and creates less stress on surrounding environments due to its unique ability to change location with the ocean’s current.

Subscribe to MOTHERBOARD: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-To-MOTHERBOARD

Follow MOTHERBOARD
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/motherboardtv
Twitter: http://twitter.com/motherboard
Tumblr: http://motherboardtv.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/motherboardtv

Channel: Motherboard
Published: 2014-12-18 19:21:55
Duration: 10M3S
Views: 1777559
Likes: 20785
Favorites: 0

17 Most Unreal Rock Formations

Tourist from all over the world travel to these amazing destinations to see the strange but beautiful rock formations nature has made.

Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr

#10 Salt Piles at Salar de Uyuni
Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest salt flat, is one of the most distinct natural landmarks in the world. The immense plains of salt are viewable from space and are a huge attraction for tourists and photographers. After rainfall, the plains turn into an enormous reflective mirror that creates a surreal landscape. The piles of salt ready for harvest only add to the uncanny imagery.

# 9 Giant’s Causeway
The Giant’s Causeway is a huge oceanside area in Northern Ireland comprised of giant interlocking columns of basalt rock. Most of the columns are hexagonal in shape and perfectly fit together creating a surreal almost game-like environment. Scientifically speaking the columns were created by an ancient volcanic explosion, but it gains its name from the popular legend that the cliffs were built as a causeway by a giant in ancient times.

# 8 Balance Rock
In the Garden of Gods in Colorado Springs there are a plethora of beautiful red rock formations, but possibly the most iconic of these rocks is Balance Rock – a huge boulder that seems like it could fall over at any moment. It is destined to fall over eventually when erosion or another damage dislodges it from its gripping points. Go and see Balance Rock before it falls over and becomes just a normal rock.

# 7 Balancing Rock, Canada
There is another precarious rock, but this seems to be even more impossible. The Balancing Rock in Nova Scotia is believed to be standing for thousands of years. It’s about 30 feet tall and seems to be just standing straight up out of pure will.

# 6 Fly Geyser
This erupting rock is Fly Geyser, an accidental man-made geothermal geyser in Washoe County. The fountain was created in 1964 when people were exploring sources of geothermal energy and accidentally drilled into a well. The well was never capped properly and has now become a geyser that shoots water into the air, creating the ever growing rock formation around it. It looks like a weird alien structure because of thermophilic algae that thrive in the high temperatures Fly Geyser generates.

# 5 Split Apple Rock
Tokangawhā, aka Split Apple Rock, is a geological rock formation off the coast of South Island of New Zealand. It is a structure made of granite and looks almost like it was deliberately cut in half. This cleft was natural, though, with no help from any humans. What exactly could have cut this boulder in half is a mystery although theories include water creeping into the rock, freezing, and expanding to break the rock. It’s a popular spot for tourists to take the exact same photo every year.

# 4 Moeraki Boulders
The Moeraki Boulders are unusually large and spherical boulders that are spread along Koekohe Beach on the Otago coast of New Zealand. Local Maori legends explain the boulders as the remains of eel baskets from the large sailing canoe that brought Maori people to the island hundreds of years ago. These stones are usually hollow but sometimes they are filled with calcite and quartz, which makes it look very interesting when they are broken open or exposed.

# 3 Folding Rocks at Agia Pavlos
These interesting looking rocks are known commonly as the Folding Rocks. They are sedimentary limestone layers were once layered horizontally at the bottom of the sea, but tectonic plates pushed them together and forced them upwards.

# 2 Torghatten
Torghatten is a granite mountain on Torget island in Norway. As far as mountains go it looks pretty uncharacteristic and lumpy except for the giant gaping hole right in the middle of it. According to legend, the mountain hole was made by a troll who was chasing a beautiful girl. Knowing he could never catch the girl he shot an arrow at her, but the Troll King threw his hat to save her and that hat turned into the mountain. Sounds pretty legit to me.

# 1 Abandoned Russian Salt Mine
This abandoned Russian Salt Mine looks more like a scene from a trippy art house movie. The naturally occurring minerals in the abandoned mine create psychedelic patterns and structures which create unique swirls. While the naturally occurring art in these walls are beautiful, exploring the mines are not without danger. There are hazards of falling, landslides, and low visibility, but it might be worth facing to see this one of a kind place.

Channel: Talltanic
Published: 2016-09-14 19:37:48
Duration: 7M46S
Views: 2888106
Likes: 12262
Favorites: 0

Ancient Egypt 101 | National Geographic

The Ancient Egyptian civilization, famous for its pyramids, pharaohs, mummies, and tombs, flourished for thousands of years. But what was its lasting impact? Learn how Ancient Egypt contributed to society with its many cultural developments, particularly in language and mathematics.
➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

Get More National Geographic:
Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite
Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo
Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter
Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta

Ancient Egypt 101 | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/hO1tzmi1V5g

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-12-13 23:00:08
Duration: 6M14S
Views: 392888
Likes: 6853
Favorites: 0

Shoebill Chick Reveals Darkside | Africa | BBC

The rivalry between two shoebill chicks becomes apparent when their mother leaves to fetch water.

Taken from Africa.

Subscribe to BBC Earth: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSubBBC Earth YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCEarth

BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth (ex-UK only)
BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth

Visit http://www.bbc.com/earth/world for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos

This is a channel from BBC Worldwide, trading as BBC Studios, who help fund new BBC programmes.

Channel: BBC Earth
Published: 2016-01-21 18:58:41
Duration: 4M9S
Views: 2585624
Likes: 17445
Favorites: 0

12 Things Your Stool Says About Your Health

How to understand if you’re really healthy? Here’s the easiest way to do it: check your stool colors and what learn they mean. As gross as it may sound, the color and shape of your stool can reveal a lot about your health. Any changes you might notice can be a sign of a serious disease.

TIMESTAMPS
Stool color 0:29
White 1:08
Green 2:00
Yellow 2:39
Black 3:38
Red 4:17
Stool shape 5:29

SUMMARY
– If you see separate solid lumps reminiscent of nuts or goat feces in your toilet bowl, it is likely a sign of severe constipation. This type of stool means your body lacks fiber.
– Sausage-shaped, large, and lumpy stool speaks of constipation.
This type of stool is also caused by a lack of fiber.
– If the cracked sausage-shaped stool is what you usually have, there are no reasons to worry. That’s a normal stool. You’re doing just fine!
– If you stand with those whose feces are soft, sausage-shaped, and smooth – congratulations! Your stool is as perfect as stool can be!
– Soft lumps with clear edges are a sign of light diarrhea.
It could also mean that you are experiencing irritable bowel syndrome.
– If your stool comes in fluffy pieces with ragged edges, it looks like you are having mild diarrhea. Remember how we told you to have more fiber? Well, in this case, it is just the opposite. Maybe there’s too much fiber in your diet. 
– Liquid without solid pieces type of feces is what no one likes to see. It speaks of severe diarrhea.

Do you take problems with your stools seriously? Do you consult doctors when needed? Feel free to share in the comments section below!

Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz

—————————————————————————————-
Our Social Media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/

SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L

5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC

Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo

—————————————————————————————-
For more videos and articles visit:
http://www.brightside.me/

Channel: BRIGHT SIDE
Published: 2018-02-20 08:40:05
Duration: 11M9S
Views: 6450017
Likes: 103157
Favorites: 0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *