Rare Dumbo Octopus Shows Off for Deep-sea Submersible | National Geographic

The rarely observed, ghostly white cephalopod delights scientists remotely exploring an underwater volcano.
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Commonly called a ‘dumbo’ octopus, this deep-sea cephalopod has lateral fins that resemble big ears. Little is known about the ghostly white Grimpoteuthis octopus’s behavior, because it’s rarely observed. Crew aboard the E/V Nautilus had an exciting encounter with the rare, ghostly white cephalopod. The Nautilus is surveying an unexplored area of Davidson Seamount, an inactive volcano. The rocky habitat hosts large coral forests, sponge fields, and abundant unidentified species.

Read more in “Mesmerizing, rare dumbo octopus filmed in the deep sea”
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Rare Dumbo Octopus Shows Off For Deep-sea Submersible | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/pl4pqu5FTaI

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Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic

A thin mother polar bear roaming with her critically hungry cub inspects a resting walrus, on the chance that it’s sick or dead, but it’s quite capable of defending itself.
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Travis Wilkinson and his family were on a sailing trip in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, far north of the Arctic Circle. In late July, 2015, they were traveling through Hinlopen Strait, west of the largest island, Spitsbergen—an impossible route some summers, when pack ice blocks passage. But that summer, ice was especially sparse, making hunting harder for polar bears. These apex predators favor waiting at the sea ice’s edge, striking seals as they approach. A few days earlier, the Wilkinson family had been farther north, near the ice. There, bears looked healthy. But the scene just after midnight on July 23 was desperate. Mother and cub were struggling, skin hanging loose. According to Jon Aars, of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the cub, seven or eight months old, was likely to die if its mother didn’t eat soon. She probably wasn’t lactating. Wilkinson saw the bear sniff the air, picking up something of interest. This thin female couldn’t attack a healthy, full-grown walrus. A carcass would solve their problem. If the walrus were weak or sick, predation might be an option. But that walrus was alive and well. The situation was unworkable. The search for food went on.

Read more about the polar bear and walrus, “Desperate for Food, Polar Bear Tests Walrus”
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Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/FAHA6M7xT5M

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-02-09 21:43:44
Duration: 2M59S
Views: 3570730
Likes: 8730
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Pangolins: The Most Trafficked Mammal You’ve Never Heard Of | National Geographic

What are pangolins? If you’ve never heard of the pangolin, you’re not alone. This shy creature, as big as your cat or dog, is the world’s most trafficked mammal — with more than one million pangolins poached in the past decade. Learn more about the pangolin, why all eight pangolin species are at risk of extinction, and the conservation efforts needed to save them.
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Pangolins: The Most Trafficked Mammal You’ve Never Heard Of | National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-05-17 22:08:04
Duration: 4M36S
Views: 281818
Likes: 4178
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Extraordinary Octopus Takes To Land | The Hunt | BBC Earth

New David Attenborough series Dynasties coming soon! Watch the first trailer here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWI1eCbksdE –~–
Octopuses are marine animals, that live and breath underwater, so at low tide one would expect them to be imprisoned in rocky pools. This extraordinary species found in Northern Australia is like no other Octopus, and land is no obstacle when hunting for Crabs. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub

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Channel: BBC Earth
Published: 2017-07-06 13:44:37
Duration: 3M55S
Views: 6086946
Likes: 36036
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A 750-Year-Old Secret: See How Soy Sauce Is Still Made Today | Short Film Showcase

See how Japanese soy sauce has been made for 750 years in this fascinating short film by Mile Nagaoka.
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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

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In the 13th century, a Japanese priest returned from a trip to China and settled in the small, coastal town of Yuasa in Japan’s Wakayama Prefecture. He brought with him several new skills that he had learned from the Chinese, including a process for making miso (a soybean paste). The liquid byproduct of this miso-making process was eventually adopted by the people of Yuasa as a condiment of its own—giving birth to what we know today as soy sauce.

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A 750-Year-Old Secret: See How Soy Sauce Is Still Made Today | Short Film Showcase
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-04-26 16:03:42
Duration: 5M38S
Views: 1822761
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Faster than a calculator | Arthur Benjamin | TEDxOxford

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Benjamin makes numbers dance. In his day job, he’s a professor of mathematics at Harvey Mudd College; in his other day job, he’s a “Mathemagician,” taking the stage to perform high-speed mental calculations, memorisations and other astounding mathematic stunts. It’s part of his drive to teach math and mental agility in interesting ways, following in the footsteps of such heroes as Martin Gardner.

TEDxOxford is organised by University of Oxford students, aiming to bring together the young minds of tomorrow’s world with the movers and shakers of today. TEDxOxford is kindly sponsored by Neptune Investment Management – http://www.neptunefunds.com

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Channel: TEDx Talks
Published: 2013-04-08 15:54:49
Duration: 15M4S
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