Only 35 Left, Government Wants to Let People Hunt Them, Endangered Red Wolf

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced plans to allow private landowners to kill critically endangered red wolves that stray onto their property from a protected federal wildlife refuge in North Carolina.
http://marygreeley.com/?p=71932

the gorilla broke the glass… and then this happened…

the gorilla broke the glass… and then this happened…
gorilla zoo compilation epic funny awesome video to watch! party animals loud kids.

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Video Inspired by Mastersaint & Infinite Lists & IYoutube

Channel: Duckie
Published: 2017-10-09 03:15:22
Duration: 5M11S
Views: 30784487
Likes: 129225
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these bucks are too tame

tame bucks
Channel: Paulywog35
Published: 2011-02-02 05:37:09
Duration: 4M41S
Views: 2050844
Likes: 21336
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Doves chicks die in nest; How the parents reacted

FURTHER UPDATE (June 5, 2015): I received this message from John, a biologist. I think this answers most of your questions. Thanks John!!

“Goodpasture had the answer in hand when he examined the nest and saw the thousands of mites. Both rodents and birds that reuse their nests have a chronic problem of mite buildup that can be fatal to the young. Both scavenger and parasitic mites can rapidly increase in the warm nest in a short time. And as the nest is gradually increased over time, more mite survive over the unused time. Mites will develop on organic materials available from both adult and young feces, bits of food, nesting material that may include adult saliva used as an adhesive and young chicks. Mites are too small for the adults to see or remove even if they did. Towards the end of the video it appears that the male was viewing the remaining chick as it was swarming with mites,trying to figure out what was occurring. Naked chicks and rodents are fair game for rapidly developing mite populations. Keep in mind why there are bird baths and why adult birds dust themselves on the ground: removal of mites and other ectoparasites.
Those who provide platforms for nesting birds for pleasure or photography should remove the nesting material after the fledge and provide a small amount of similar material on the platform as an incentive for a return.
The world is beautiful as your photography records, but we know it also has many other dimensions that are not pleasant but very real. Now that you know I am hopeful that your (doves) fledge rate greatly increases. Thank you for letting me have a say.”

Thanks again to John. Feel free to comment but keep it clean, relevant and professional.

2014 UPDATE: Let me try to reply to some of the comments made. First, I don’t know WHY they died. I NEVER interfered with the birds. My best guess is disease. There were literally thousands of mites all over the nest. The lamp had nothing to do with their deaths. Before this, the doves had raised two successful broods. And AFTER, a pair of robins successfully raise four chicks. As for the music… get over it!! I wasn’t able to capture much sound so I used music as best I could to capture the mood and emotion of what’s happening. Finally, I’m kind of shocked a level of immaturity of people’s posts. Come on!! Keep it clean and relevant! One more thing: a LOT of people commented on the birds “stepping” on the young. I’ve noticed this throughout all of the different birds that have raised young. It doesn’t appear to injure the chicks, but I agree it does seem odd. I have many more hours of other bird activities. I just need to find the time to edit them down to the best and most interesting moments.

After raising two successful broods, a pair of mourning doves had their chicks unexpectedly die just days after hatching. I happened to get video the day before and after they hatched. A few days later when I noticed one had died, I set up the video camera to capture the aftermath and how the parents reacted. Truly fascinating view of the natural behavior of how the dove parents handled the situation.

Channel: Victor Goodpasture
Published: 2011-07-10 20:38:04
Duration: 9M36S
Views: 6819723
Likes: 24785
Favorites: 0

Wolf vs Elk – Wild Animal Interaction

Wolf vs Elk – Wild Animal Interaction.

The gray wolf or grey wolf, also known as the timber wolf or western wolf, is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia and North America. It is the largest extant member of its family, with males averaging 43–45 kg (95–99 lb), and females 36–38.5 kg (79–85 lb). Like the red wolf, it is distinguished from other Canis species by its larger size and less pointed features, particularly on the ears and muzzle. Its winter fur is long and bushy, and predominantly a mottled gray in color, although nearly pure white, red, or brown to black also occur. The gray wolf is the second most specialised member of the genus Canis, after the Ethiopian wolf, as demonstrated by its morphological adaptations to hunting large prey, its more gregarious nature, and its highly advanced expressive behavior. It is nonetheless closely related enough to smaller Canis species, such as the eastern wolf, coyote, and golden jackal to produce fertile hybrids. It is the only species of Canis to have a range encompassing both the Old and New Worlds, and originated in Eurasia during the Pleistocene, colonizing North America on at least three separate occasions during the Rancholabrean. It is a social animal, travelling in nuclear families consisting of a mated pair, accompanied by the pair’s adult offspring. The gray wolf is typically an apex predator throughout its range, with only humans and tigers posing a serious threat to it. It feeds primarily on large ungulates, though it also eats smaller animals, livestock, carrion, and garbage. The gray wolf is one of the world’s best known and well researched animals, with probably more books written about it than any other wildlife species.

The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia), is the largest extant species in the deer family. Moose are distinguished by the broad, flat (or palmate) antlers of the males; other members of the family have antlers with a dendritic configuration. Moose typically inhabit boreal forests and temperate broadleaf and mixed forests of the Northern Hemisphere in temperate to subarctic climates. Hunting and other human activities have caused a reduction in the size of the moose’s range over time. Moose have been reintroduced to some of their former habitats. Currently, most moose are found in Canada, Alaska, New England, Fennoscandia, Latvia, Estonia and Russia. Their diet consists of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are the gray wolf along with bears and humans. Unlike most other deer species, moose are solitary animals and do not form herds.

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Channel: Stonehenge
Published: 2017-01-27 23:13:28
Duration: 4M48S
Views: 1030466
Likes: 1228
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