New Invention Keeps Deep-Sea Creatures Alive at Surface | National Geographic

A new pressurized chamber designed by the California Academy of Sciences and Monterey Bay Aquarium can now transport fish safely from the deep-sea to the surface.
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This is the Submersible Chamber of Ascending Specimen, or SubCAS for short. It’s a pressurized chamber designed to safely bring deep-sea fish to the surface. When deep-dwelling fish ascend several hundred feet, the change in pressure damages their swim bladders. The SubCAS works to correct this rapid change in pressure. Scientist will now be able to study these previously hard-to-reach fish in a controlled environment.

Read more in “This Invention Helps Deep-Dwelling Fish Journey to the Surface”
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New Invention Keeps Deep-Sea Creatures Alive at Surface | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/3cqIvIbKvvM

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Exclusive: Deep-Sea Sharks and More Spotted by New Camera | National Geographic

National Geographic’s remote imaging team uses drop-cam technology to explore deep ocean mysteries. In this video, mechanical engineer Alan Turchik explains how the drop cam works and reveals footage of underwater life never seen before in the Chagos Archipelago in the Indian Ocean. The camera captured images of a gulper shark, not previously known to occupy these waters. The January 2015 expedition was organized by the Bertarelli Foundation and led by Zoological Society of London researcher Tom Letessier. The National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program also supported the expedition.
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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY & PRODUCER: Kip Evans
EDITORS: Connor Gallagher and Kip Evans
DROPCAM FOOTAGE: Alan Turchik
ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: Luke Barnett, Richard Wollocombe, and Alan Turchik
SENIOR PRODUCER FOR NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: Jeff Hertrick
SPECIAL THANKS: British Indian Ocean Territory Administration

Exclusive: Deep-Sea Sharks and More Spotted by New Camera | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/ZdJYKRg99Pw

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2015-04-29 02:49:09
Duration: 5M24S
Views: 239010
Likes: 1383
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Solar System 101 | National Geographic

How many planets are in the solar system? How did it form in the Milky Way galaxy? Learn facts about the solar system’s genesis, plus its planets, moons, and asteroids.
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Solar System 101 | National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-08-29 21:01:01
Duration: 4M11S
Views: 1612244
Likes: 11606
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Cork in a Bottle | National Geographic

Tim demonstrates an unlikely way to get a cork out of a bottle.
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Cork in a Bottle | National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2014-04-30 19:33:35
Duration: 2M46S
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A 750-Year-Old Secret: See How Soy Sauce Is Still Made Today | Short Film Showcase

See how Japanese soy sauce has been made for 750 years in this fascinating short film by Mile Nagaoka.
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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com

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In the 13th century, a Japanese priest returned from a trip to China and settled in the small, coastal town of Yuasa in Japan’s Wakayama Prefecture. He brought with him several new skills that he had learned from the Chinese, including a process for making miso (a soybean paste). The liquid byproduct of this miso-making process was eventually adopted by the people of Yuasa as a condiment of its own—giving birth to what we know today as soy sauce.

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A 750-Year-Old Secret: See How Soy Sauce Is Still Made Today | Short Film Showcase
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2017-04-26 16:03:42
Duration: 5M38S
Views: 1676126
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See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | National Geographic

How do you cool a building without air conditioning? Using an approach called biomimicry, see how architect Mick Pearce harnessed the ingenuity of termites to design a natural cooling system for the largest commercial building in Zimbabwe.
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In nature, termites build skyscraper-like mounds that are ventilated by a complex system of tunnels. By emulating the ingenuity of termites, Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce used an approach called biomimicry to design a natural cooling system that harnessed nature. The result is an architectural marvel that achieves 90 percent passive climate control by taking cool air into the building at night and expelling heat throughout the day.

In this first installation of the Decoder series, see how the Eastgate Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe utilizes a termite-inspired climate control system. To learn more, read “Termite Climate Control” from the May 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine.

See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/620omdSZzBs

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-05-23 21:10:19
Duration: 3M42S
Views: 391762
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