National Geographic: Symphony for Our World, European Premiere

Saturday September 29th, Gaelic Grounds Limerick

Tickets from €59.50 incl. booking fee.
www.gaelicgrounds.ie

A 90-minute immersive symphonic experience, a feast for the eyes, for the ears and for the heart! National Geographic natural history footage perfectly synchronised with an original symphony, performed live on stage by the National Geographic Symphony Orchestra, led by Irish Composer Kenneth Rice.

A fully-seated show for all the family!

Can You Survive Quicksand? | I Didn’t Know That

Is it possible to survive being stuck in quicksand? Jonny Phillips risks life and limb to experience firsthand what it is like to slowly sink into quicksand—just a few feet away from an incoming tide.
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About I Didn’t Know That:
Two industrial scientists, Richard Ambrose and Jonny Phillips, explain the science behind everyday life… from microwave ovens to beating a lie detector.

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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

Can You Survive Quicksand? | I Didn’t Know That
https://youtu.be/a2VJqud3Ls8

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2013-03-18 21:39:54
Duration: 5M9S
Views: 18948214
Likes: 101936
Favorites: 0

How to travel the world with almost no money | Tomislav Perko | TEDxTUHH

Many people daydream about traveling the world, but all of them have the same excuse – lack of money. Tomislav, after traveling the world for years with almost no money, shows how it is possible for everyone to do the same, if they really want to.

Tomislav Perko, 29, is a travel writer from Croatia. After a career of a stockbroker, broke because of the financial crisis, he hits the road and turns it into his home. He uses alternative ways of traveling – hitchhiking, couchsurfing, working/volunteering, and manages to wander around the world with just a little bit of money in his pocket, meeting the most amazing people on the way.

Five years later, he publishes a book “1000 Days of Spring” and goes around giving lectures about what it means to live on the road. Find out more on his website: http://tomislavperko.com/en/.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Channel: TEDx Talks
Published: 2015-02-09 17:53:23
Duration: 18M19S
Views: 4887416
Likes: 132888
Favorites: 0

Why Are Wild Parrots Disappearing in Miami? | Short Film Showcase

In Miami, conservationist Daria Feinstein is on a mission to save the beautiful Blue-and-yellow Macaw—before it’s too late.
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About Short Film Showcase:
The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com

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Since the species is not native to Florida, they are not protected by state law and poachers can legally capture the birds and their chicks for the lucrative pet trade. Watching the local population dwindle, Feinstein fights to raise awareness and protect her beloved birds for future generations in this short by Day’s Edge Productions (http://www.daysedge.com/).

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

Why Are Wild Parrots Disappearing in Miami? | Short Film Showcase
https://youtu.be/6pYleuyC0QY

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-07-02 18:56:10
Duration: 8M32S
Views: 16461
Likes: 1018
Favorites: 0

Agafia. Hermit Surviving in Russian Wilderness for 70 years

More films about religion: https://rtd.rt.com/tags/religion/
Soon after this film aired, Agafia found a helper who has now been living with her for more than a year. Georgy Danilov, 53, is from Orenburg. He is an Old Believer. It was Agafia’s spiritual father who found and blessed her helper. Georgy has been doing the toughest chores for almost two years: he chops firewood, brings water from the river, and digs the vegetable garden. Agafia doesn’t always see eye to eye with Georgy. She views him as a novice and demands his full obedience and submission, which doesn’t always sit well with Georgy. Despite their differences, they try to find common ground. Apart from the main helper, volunteers and students from various Russian cities also come to Agafia’s hut to help her out.

In the mid-17th century, the leader of Russia’s Orthodox Church, Patriarch Nikon, introduced radical reforms in Russia. Many couldn’t accept the changes and became known as “Old Believers”. To avoid religious persecution first from the Orthodox Church and then from the Soviets, families fled to some of the most remote corners of the world. In 1978, one such family was discovered by a group of geologists in the remote Russian Republic of Khakassia, Siberia. The Lykovs looked as if they belonged to a previous century: they dressed in homespun clothes and used primitive instruments in their everyday life. They were completely self-sufficient and still highly religious.

Today, Agafia, 70, is the last surviving member of this family. When RT Doc filmmakers met her, she was in desperate need of a helper. They encourage her to write a letter to Old Believers everywhere in an attempt to find one. This letter, written in Old Slavonic language, is available on our site.

The film crew also interviews Erofey Sedov, a former drilling geologist. He was one of those who discovered the Lykovs and told the world about them. He got to know them well and is now ready to share information that will make us see the familiar story of this family of hermits in a different light. But is any of it true?

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Channel: RT Documentary
Published: 2014-09-22 12:05:13
Duration: 52M7S
Views: 2610812
Likes: 15890
Favorites: 0

The Seven Wonders Of The World – BBC Documentary

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The Seven Wonders of the World (or the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) refers to remarkable constructions of classical antiquity listed by various authors in guidebooks popular among the ancient Hellenic tourists, particularly in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. The most prominent of these, the versions by Antipater of Sidon and an observer identified as Philo of Byzantium, comprise seven works located around the eastern Mediterranean rim. The original list inspired innumerable versions through the ages, often listing seven entries. Of the original Seven Wonders, only one—the Great Pyramid of Giza, the oldest of the ancient wonders—remains relatively intact.

Background
In this painting by Maerten van Heemskerck, the seven wonders of the ancient world are depicted as a background for the abduction of Helen by Paris. The Walters Art Museum.

The Greek conquest of much of the known world in the 4th century BC gave Hellenistic travellers access to the civilizations of the Egyptians, Persians, and Babylonians. Impressed and captivated by the landmarks and marvels of the various lands, these travellers began to list what they saw to remember them.

Instead of “wonders”, the ancient Greeks spoke of “theamata” (θεάματα), which means “sights”, in other words “things to be seen”. (Τὰ ἑπτὰ θεάματα τῆς οἰκουμένης [γῆς] Ta hepta theamata tēs oikoumenēs [gēs]) Later, the word for “wonder” (“thaumata” θαύματα) was used, and this is also the case in modern Greek (Επτά θαύματα του αρχαίου κόσμου). Hence, the list was meant to be the Ancient World’s counterpart of a travel guidebook.

Each person had his own version of the list, but the best known and earliest surviving was from a poem by Greek-speaking epigrammist Antipater of Sidon from around 140 BC. He named six of the seven sites on his list—leaving out the lighthouse—, but was primarily in praise of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Another 2nd century BC observer, who claimed to be the mathematician Philo of Byzantium, wrote a short account entitled The Seven Sights of the World. However, the incomplete surviving manuscript only covered six of the supposedly seven places, which agreed with Antipater’s list.

Earlier and later lists by the historian Herodotus (484 BC–ca. 425 BC) and the architect Callimachus of Cyrene (ca. 305–240 BC), housed at the Museum of Alexandria, survived only as references.

The Colossus of Rhodes was the last of the seven to be completed, after 280 BC, and the first to be destroyed, by an earthquake in 226/225 BC. Hence, all seven existed at the same time for a period of less than 60 years. Antipater had an earlier version which replaced Lighthouse of Alexandria with the Walls of Babylon. Lists which preceded the construction of Colossus of Rhodes completed their seven entries with the inclusion of the Ishtar Gate.

Scope

It is thought that the limitation of the lists to seven entries was attributed to the special magical meaning of the number. Geographically, the list covered only the sculptural and architectural monuments of the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern regions, which then comprised the known world for the Greeks. Hence, extant sites beyond this realm were not considered as part of contemporary accounts.

The primary accounts, coming from Hellenistic writers, also heavily influenced the places included in the wonders list. Five of the seven entries are a celebration of Greek accomplishments in the arts and architecture (the exceptions being the Pyramids of Giza and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon).

Channel: Documentaries HD
Published: 2015-01-19 08:52:36
Duration: 1H35M48S
Views: 4001771
Likes: 10252
Favorites: 0

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