Millennial Monks Adapt to a Modernizing World | National Geographic

These are Mongolia’s millennial monks. Today, they are in charge of more and more of the country’s monasteries. This new generation of monks are coming of age after decades of Soviet religious persecution.
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Roughly 17,000 monks were killed with the arrival of Communism in the 1930s. This is Amarbayasgalant monastery, currently home to 40 monks. It had 800 before the Soviet era. In a modernizing world, finding young people to pursue this career is becoming difficult but the monks at Amarbayasgalant remain faithfully committed to the future.

Read more in “These Millennial Monks Are Adapting to a Modernizing World”
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/06/millennial-monks-mongolia-communism-culture/

Millennial Monks Adapt to a Modernizing World | National Geographic
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Inside a Lost African Tribe Still Living in India Today | Short Film Showcase

In the dense forests of South Asia, a native African tribe has been living in quiet obscurity for more than 500 years.
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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

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Known as the Siddis, their ancestors originated from the Great Lakes region before being captured and brought to India as Arab slaves. When slavery was outlawed in the 18th and 19th centuries, the Siddis feared persecution and retreated into the forests, where they have been living ever since. Today, the Siddi people are considered to be in the lowest bracket of the Hindu caste system—the Sudras, or the “untouchables.” In this short film by photographer and filmmaker Asha Stuart, get a rare look inside the Siddi tribal villages and explore the cultural diversity of this African-Diaspora community.

Asha Stuart: https://vimeo.com/ashastuart

Read more in “How This African-American Filmmaker Was Inspired By African Indians”

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Inside a Lost African Tribe Still Living in India Today | Short Film Showcase
https://youtu.be/B_a1WS5ncDk

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-04-20 17:17:38
Duration: 13M53S
Views: 344254
Likes: 10091
Favorites: 0

This Concrete Dome Holds A Leaking Toxic Timebomb | Foreign Correspondent

Thousands of cubic metres of radioactive waste lies buried under a concrete dome on the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, the legacy of over a decade of US nuclear tests in the Pacific.

Now rising sea levels are threatening to spill its contents into the sea.

Read more here: http://ab.co/2BdJKCz

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Foreign Correspondent is the prime-time international public affairs program on Australia’s national broadcaster, ABC-TV. We produce half-hour duration in-depth reports for broadcast across the ABC’s television channels and digital platforms. Since 1992, our teams have journeyed to more than 170 countries to report on war, natural calamity and social and political upheaval – through the eyes of the people at the heart of it all.

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Channel: ABC News (Australia)
Published: 2017-11-27 02:55:19
Duration: 41M35S
Views: 1849826
Likes: 21546
Favorites: 0

Surviving in the Siberian Wilderness for 70 Years (Full Length)

In 1936, a family of Russian Old Believers journeyed deep into Siberia’s vast taiga to escape persecution and protect their way of life. The Lykovs eventually settled in the Sayan Mountains, 160 miles from any other sign of civilization. In 1944, Agafia Lykov was born into this wilderness. Today, she is the last surviving Lykov, remaining steadfast in her seclusion. In this episode of Far Out, the VICE crew travels to Agafia to learn about her taiga lifestyle and the encroaching influence of the outside world.

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Channel: VICE
Published: 2013-04-04 22:12:24
Duration: 35M45S
Views: 3897407
Likes: 26978
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Baboon Attack! | National Geographic

Hungry baboons in Kenya’s Lake Bogoria find themselves surrounded by a million unsuspecting — and unprotected — flamingos.
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Baboon Attack! | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/7Xx1jh6MmB8

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2013-05-03 14:10:33
Duration: 2M38S
Views: 2131765
Likes: 2625
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Kiribati: a drowning paradise in the South Pacific | DW Documentary

Climate change and rising sea levels mean the island nation of Kiribati in the South Pacific is at risk of disappearing into the sea.

But the island’s inhabitants aren’t giving up. They are doing what they can to save their island from inundation. Can COP23 help make a difference?

UN estimates indicate that Kiribati could disappear in just 30 or 40 years. That’s because the average elevation is less than two meters above sea level. And some of the knock-on effects of climate change have made the situation more difficult. Kiribati can hardly be surpassed in terms of charm and natural beauty. There are 33 atolls and one reef island – spread out over an area of 3.5 million square kilometers. All have white, sandy beaches and blue lagoons. Kiribati is the world’s largest state that consists exclusively of atolls. A local resident named Kaboua points to the empty, barren land around him and says, “There used to be a large village here with 70 families.” But these days, this land is only accessible at low tide. At high tide, it’s all under water. Kaboua says that sea levels are rising all the time, and swallowing up the land. That’s why many people here build walls made of stone and driftwood, or sand or rubbish. But these barriers won’t stand up to the increasing number of storm surges. Others are trying to protect against coastal erosion by planting mangrove shrubs or small trees. But another local resident, Vasiti Tebamare, remains optimistic. She works for KiriCAN, an environmental organization. Vasiti says: “The industrialized countries — the United States, China, and Europe — use fossil fuels for their own ends. But what about us?” Kiribati’s government has even bought land on an island in Fiji, so it can evacuate its people in an emergency. But Vasiti and most of the other residents don’t want to leave.
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Channel: DW Documentary
Published: 2017-11-07 14:22:28
Duration: 42M51S
Views: 1037063
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