Inside the Mission to Save the Rare Helmeted Hornbill From Poachers | National Geographic

What does it take to photograph the helmeted hornbill? Patience. National Geographic photographer Tim Laman teamed up with Rangkong Indonesia and spent months in the field just to get a glimpse of the extremely rare bird. The helmeted hornbill is one of 57 hornbill species in Africa and Asia. It’s found only in the lowland forests of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, and southern Thailand. The helmeted hornbill stands apart from the other hornbills because its casque—the horny helmet above its beak—is mostly solid with a thick layer of keratin. But that unique trait might also be the birds’ undoing. Softer than ivory and easily carved, hornbill casques are in high demand in Asia, to be fashioned into beads, pendants, and intricate works of art. Illegal poaching has caused this bird to be on the critically endangered list.
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Read the full story: “What It Took to Find and Photograph the Helmeted Hornbill,” featured in the September 2018 issue of National Geographic.
https://on.natgeo.com/2Ny34B5

This video was produced in collaboration with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. National Geographic is partnering with the National Audubon Society, BirdLife International, and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to celebrate the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Watch for more stories, books, and events throughout 2018, the Year of the Bird.
http://www.audubon.org/
http://www.birdlife.org/
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Page.aspx?pid=1478
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/year-of-bird/
https://www.nationalgeographic.org/projects/year-of-the-bird/

Inside the Mission to Save the Rare Helmeted Hornbill From Poachers | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/tm8yfEM7Ps8

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Japanese Street Food – BLUEFIN TUNA CUTTING SHOW & SUSHI / SASHIMI MEAL

Bluefin tuna is one of the most highly prized fish used in Japanese raw fish dishes. About 80% of the caught Atlantic and Pacific bluefin tunas are consumed in Japan. The fish is renowned for fetching high bids at the first auction of the year in Tokyo’s Tsukiji Market. The world’s most expensive fish is the 222-kilogram bluefin tuna that sold for $1.8 Million (155.4 million yen) in January 2017.

In this video, a large tuna is separated into sections of differing grades and prepared into a delicious sushi meal.

Japanese began eating tuna sushi in the 1840s, when a large catch came into Edo [old Tokyo] one season. A chef marinated a few pieces in soy sauce and served it as nigiri sushi. At that time, these fish were nicknamed shibi — “four days” — because chefs would bury them for four days to mellow their bloody taste.

Channel: Travel Thirsty
Published: 2017-06-18 20:39:42
Duration: 24M50S
Views: 10000922
Likes: 27159
Favorites: 0

These Rare Giraffes Were Killed Just for Their Tails (Exclusive Video) | National Geographic

The killing of three rare Kordofan giraffes inspired a filmmaker to transform his anger into action. David Hamlin was on assignment in the Democratic Republic of the Congo when he saw a female and two male giraffes peacefully making their way through the tall grass. The next morning he learned that the three animals were found shot and mutilated. Shocked by the news and compelled to uncover the truth, Hamlin decided to visit the site of the killings to document this horrific act. Accompanied by armed rangers from the nonprofit conservation organization African Parks and the Congolese Parks Authority ICCN, he ventured through the volatile grounds of Garamba National Park. There he learned that the giraffes were killed for something worth thousands of U.S. dollars: their tails.
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Garamba National Park is a battleground where heavily armed groups poach wildlife for resources and monetary gain. This latest incident was a major blow to the rangers, because the number for Kordofan giraffes in that area has dwindled down to 37. However, Hamlin hopes this tragedy will galvanize the efforts of conservationists and others who fight to protect the world’s endangered animals.

Read more about these giraffes’ death on NG News.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/08/wildlife-giraffes-garamba-national-park-poaching-tails/

Learn more about African Parks’ work in protecting Africa’s national parks.
https://www.african-parks.org/
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/150625-giraffes-animals-science-conservation-africa-endangered/

Learn about the efforts to protect Africa’s giraffes.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/150625-giraffes-animals-science-conservation-africa-endangered/

Learn more about giraffes.
http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/giraffe/

These Rare Giraffes Were Killed Just for Their Tails (Exclusive Video) | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/FCFVkqoektU

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2016-08-11 22:58:00
Duration: 8M48S
Views: 151438
Likes: 2596
Favorites: 0

Black Market Demand for ‘Red Ivory’ Is Dooming This Rare Bird | Short Film Showcase

The rare and beautiful helmeted hornbill is vanishing at an alarming rate from the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. Prized for their red keratin “helmets,” this unique large bird species has been so heavily poached it is now more endangered than elephants.
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About Short Film Showcase:
The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com

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Further exacerbating the problem, the species only breeds once a year and hatches just one chick at a time. Since the females rely on the males for food, the poaching of the male is also a death sentence for the female and her chick.

Although wealthy buyers in China drive the black market demand today, native people in Borneo have carved hornbill casques into intricate ornamental pieces for more than 2,000 years. In this short documentary, filmmaker Luca Verducci pulls back the the curtain on this illegal trade by following both a poacher and conservation photographer in their search for the critically endangered species.

Learn more about the plight of the helmeted hornbills here.
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160316-helmeted-hornbill-trafficking-smuggling-red-ivory/

About filmmaker Luca Verducci: https://www.inventati.org/lucaverducci/

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

Black Market Demand for ‘Red Ivory’ Is Dooming This Rare Bird | Short Film Showcase
https://youtu.be/e3XceA4eukY

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-03-16 15:39:07
Duration: 13M9S
Views: 170105
Likes: 2008
Favorites: 0

Robert E Fuller: Amazing footage of kingfishers inside their nest

An Artist’s Research: Watch this amazing video of how a pair of kingfishers raise their chicks inside this artificial nest. Watch the courtship of the kingfishers, how they lay their eggs and the moment that the kingfisher chicks are first born. Watch the kingfisher chicks being raised by their parents until they fledge. See how it inspired me to produce a painting of a kingfisher.

About Me: I am a British wildlife artist based in Thixendale, North Yorkshire. I use nestcams to study animal behaviour so that I can capture the individual characters of my wild subjects in paint. I’ve shared the best of my video research on this channel. I hope you enjoy it! See more too on my website: www.robertefuller.com

Channel: Robert E Fuller
Published: 2018-05-08 15:38:24
Duration: 20M56S
Views: 664020
Likes: 3684
Favorites: 0

ABANDONED city in America with NO LAWS | Yes Theory

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/yestheory/

A few months ago we went to visit the incredible abandoned city called Slab City. It used to be a military base but hundreds of squatters came and made it their home. We went with our friend Justin Escalona and truly had a fascinating experience. We thought the place would be hostile and dangerous when in fact it was inviting and beautiful (in it’s own way). Shout-outs to all the description readers out there you know we love you 🙂

CHECK OUT JUSTIN’S CHANNEL:
https://www.youtube.com/user/PlayTheGameFilms

The abandoned video on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otIU6Py4K_A

All music from Epidemic Sound. You can get your free 30 day trial here: https://goo.gl/kOJz12

Who are we?
Yes Theory are four friends from four different countries who constantly seek discomfort in order to grow. Ammar, Thomas, Matt and Derin met in Montreal, Canada in the summer of 2015 and bonded over their shared desire to live a life that challenged and excited them. Fast forward to a year later, the team is now based out of Los Angeles, making a show on Snapchat Discover.

Snapchat handle: yestheory
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Camera: Sony A7S Mark ii
Drone: DJI Phantom 4 Pro +

Hosts: Thomas Brag, Ammar Kandil, Derin Emre, Matt Dajer
Editor: Thomas Brag and Thomas Dajer
End Screen By: Sam Mercer – He’s awesome.. check him on Twitter: @OMPMercer

Channel: Yes Theory
Published: 2017-06-08 19:04:39
Duration: 10M19S
Views: 15068060
Likes: 189290
Favorites: 0

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