How Trees Secretly Talk to Each Other in the Forest | National Geographic

What do trees talk about? In the Douglas fir forests of Canada, see how trees “talk” to each other by forming underground symbiotic relationships—called mycorrhizae—with fungi to relay stress signals and share resources with one another.
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Read ‘Talking Trees’ in the June 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine to learn more about the Douglas fir forests of Canada and the work of forest ecologist Suzanne Simard.

How Trees Secretly Talk to Each Other in the Forest | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/7kHZ0a_6TxY

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Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world…yet

Graphene is a form of carbon that could bring us bulletproof armor and space elevators, improve medicine, and make the internet run faster — some day. For the past 15 years, consumers have been hearing about this wonder material and all the ways it could change everything. Is it really almost here, or is it another promise that is perpetually just one more breakthrough away?

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Channel: Verge Science
Published: 2018-07-09 22:24:58
Duration: 7M43S
Views: 7324437
Likes: 185045
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The Art of Shaping a Bonsai Tree | Short Film Showcase

Ryan Neil has spent over a decade working to master the Japanese art of bonsai. As he shapes and forms these miniature trees, he describes how closely intertwined humans are with them. Filmmaker Ryan Bush captures Neil’s dedication to the art form and the responsibility he holds while practicing his craft. “If you don’t respect that life and death is a very real part of the creative process of bonsai … you don’t have anything in the end except for a big dead tree.”
Visit: theartisanscup.com
A Film By: Ryan J. Bush (ryanjbush.com)
Commissioned By: Bonsai Mirai (bonsaimirai.com)
Creative Direction: The DeSpains (thedespains.com)
Opening Title Animation: Caleb Cappock (uphilldownhill.com)
Music By: C418 – Tracks used: “Taswell” and “Intro” – (c418.bandcamp.com)
Filmed in Oregon
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About Short Film Showcase:
A curated collection of the most captivating documentary shorts from filmmakers around the world. Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com

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National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible.

The Art of Shaping a Bonsai Tree | Short Film Showcase
https://youtu.be/TwqZ32TmbIU

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2015-08-06 17:59:03
Duration: 7M26S
Views: 351414
Likes: 6358
Favorites: 0

These Ancient Relics Are So Advanced They Shouldn’t Exist…

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Channel: Thoughty2
Published: 2017-10-24 17:53:43
Duration: 14M8S
Views: 6318870
Likes: 90990
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Mercury 101 | National Geographic

The planet Mercury is named after the messenger of the Roman gods because of its fleeting nature across the sky. Find out the reason behind its incredible speed, if it is indeed the hottest planet in the Solar System, and why the smallest planet in the solar system is slowly shrinking.
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Mercury 101 | National Geographic
https://youtu.be/0KBjnNuhRHs

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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-09-04 18:55:04
Duration: 3M32S
Views: 60884
Likes: 2013
Favorites: 0

How to grow a forest in your backyard | Shubhendu Sharma

Forests don’t have to be far-flung nature reserves, isolated from human life. Instead, we can grow them right where we are — even in cities. Eco-entrepreneur and TED Fellow Shubhendu Sharma grows ultra-dense, biodiverse mini-forests of native species in urban areas by engineering soil, microbes and biomass to kickstart natural growth processes. Follow along as he describes how to grow a 100-year-old forest in just 10 years, and learn how you can get in on this tiny jungle party.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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Channel: TED
Published: 2016-07-14 14:52:59
Duration: 9M12S
Views: 425836
Likes: 15503
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