After Decades of Brownface, South Asians Fight for Better Representation | National Geographic

South Asian Americans are expanding on the success of their immigrant parents, creating a blended cultural identity—and turning the tables on old stereotypes. In recent movies and on television, there’s been an increase in diversity and representation, but it wasn’t always like that. This short video explores how we got from white people in brownface to authentic storytelling and also examines stereotypes that still linger on.
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Read the full story, “Building a New American Dream,” featured in the September 2018 issue of National Geographic.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/09/south-asian-american-stereotype-kondabolu-simpsons/

This story is part of Diversity in America, a National Geographic series covering racial, ethnic, and religious groups and examining their changing roles in 21st-century life. Tell us your story with #IDefineMe.

After Decades of Brownface, South Asians Fight for Better Representation | National Geographic
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The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth

The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before.

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Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth’s living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It’s remained largely unexplored until now.

Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier

The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history.

Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission.

The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person

While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years.

The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world’s most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry.

The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they’re also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface.

With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy.

With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It’s not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth’s crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself.

We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity’s understanding of how to protect the ocean.

It’s the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep.

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Channel: The Economist
Published: 2017-03-17 16:23:00
Duration: 14M49S
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The Curious Life of a Mars Rover | Nat Geo Live

Having helped design the Mars rovers Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity, NASA engineer Kobie Boykins reveals what these robots are telling us about the existence of life on the red planet.
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The Curious Life of a Mars Rover | Nat Geo Live
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Published: 2015-01-26 17:18:54
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The mule women of Melilla on the border of Spain and Morocco | DW Documentary

The Spanish semi-enclave of Melilla lives from the trade of second-hand goods. On the shoulders of Moroccan women, goods cross Europe’s southernmost border.

It’s a lucrative business for the traders, but inhumane work for the carriers. Europe’s southernmost border runs around Melilla on North Africa’s Mediterranean coast. The city of Melilla and sister city Ceuta both share a border with Morocco and attract traders and workers who cross the border every day to earn a living. For centuries Melilla, which separates Spain from Morocco, was a Spanish colony on African soil. After Morocco gained independence Melilla remained Spanish, but even today the enclave is not recognized by the Kingdom of Morocco. Moroccan citizens can take parcels weighing up to 70 kilos through the Barrio Chino border crossing as duty-free “hand luggage” almost unchecked. Melilla is part of Spain, but doesn’t belong to the European Customs Union. The duty-free transport of goods is actually illegal, but it is tolerated as long as only hand luggage is involved – irrespective of the weight. Nora El Koukhou is one of the human mules who cart the heavy goods across the border between Spain and Morocco on their backs or on skateboards. As long as the goods are in contact with their bodies, they remain tax and duty-free. It’s a perfidious but very lucrative business for the traders and one of Melilla’s most important sources of income. But the workers – including more and more young people, as well as the old and the sick – hardly profit from this at all. They work under precarious conditions, and if the border crossings close unexpectedly early, goods traffic backs up. Carriers like Nora struggle to survive, and merchants like Mohammed Abdelkader are stuck with their goods. At the interface between Africa and Europe, the fences are getting higher and higher, but the police cannot stop the informal trade in Melilla. The border patrol force monitors the goods traffic on the border between Spain and Morocco. The documentary follows Moroccan “mule” Nora to the Barrio Chino crossing and observes the complex schemes taking place on Europe’s southernmost border.
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Channel: DW Documentary
Published: 2018-04-17 16:37:34
Duration: 26M10S
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Pangolins: The Most Trafficked Mammal You’ve Never Heard Of | National Geographic

What are pangolins? If you’ve never heard of the pangolin, you’re not alone. This shy creature, as big as your cat or dog, is the world’s most trafficked mammal — with more than one million pangolins poached in the past decade. Learn more about the pangolin, why all eight pangolin species are at risk of extinction, and the conservation efforts needed to save them.
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Pangolins: The Most Trafficked Mammal You’ve Never Heard Of | National Geographic
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Channel: National Geographic
Published: 2018-05-17 22:08:04
Duration: 4M36S
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Where does your fruit come from and at what cost? | DW Documentary

Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer and Germany’s main supplier of the fruit. Cheap labor and pesticides mean low prices in Western Europe.
While organic pineapples are now being farmed on a larger scale to increasing demand, this likewise has negative consequences for Costa Rica’s ecosystem. Tropical fruits such as pineapples, bananas and kiwis have been available in West European supermarkets for years. But the innocent appearance of these popular products is deceptive. The fruits are cheap because costs are cut in the production countries – affecting wages and health factors. Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer, and is known both for its exemplary ecological approach and for sustainable tourism. It is in this very country, however, where workers on plantations complain about a lack of rights. Pineapples are grown and harvested here in vast monoculture plantations using huge amounts of pesticides. According to studies conducted by Costa Rica’s national university, the country is not just a major tropical fruit exporter but also the world’s biggest per-hectare user of pesticides. Plantation workers have as a result been reporting rashes and headaches. At the heart of pineapple farming, to the northeast of the capital of San Jose, trucks regularly have to supply villages with clean drinking water because the groundwater has been contaminated with bromacil – a weed killer banned in the EU. In the north of the country huge pineapple plantations are threatening the livelihoods of traditional small farmers, while conventional banana plantations continue to grow across the southwest. Many supermarkets in Europe have recognized that they can make money with sustainability. Almost all the major chains have signed up to ecological quality seals that stand for responsible growing methods with low pesticide use. The example of Costa Rica, however, shows that such promises aren’t always strictly kept. Although there are farmers who have set up their own businesses with the new growing methods, and although the organic sector in Costa Rica is constantly growing, even organic bananas and pineapples require large areas of land for farming. The result is monocultures with consequences for the ecosystem.
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Channel: DW Documentary
Published: 2018-03-13 14:19:10
Duration: 26M16S
Views: 339831
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